Blog

09.08.2017

Employee of the month: Jari Partanen

People behind Laitex. We would like you to get know our employees. We introduce our employees once a month: Who they are, What they do and What is their role in our business.

Starting at Laitex

First Jari was a car mechanic and used to work as a plater at Konela import center.  “I knew Kari Suvanen since childhood because we were neighbors back then. Later Kari asked me to visit their workshop if I would be interested in working there”, Jari says. He started to work at Laitex September 1989 and he was the sixth person to work for Laitex.

He has worked at Laitex since, except between 2003-2005. When his kids were small he made quite many work trips and even at short notice. So, when another company offered him a job where he didn’t have to travel, he took it. During this job, he still visited Laitex and fixed our machines, cutters and lathes. “One evening I came to fix a machine. The Production Manager asked if I could come back to work here and I answered no. He offered to get me the tools that I want if I came back here to work. Then I said yes. He bought me back with tools”, Jari laughs.

Jari and couple friends from work trip, Alstom India

Nowadays Jari works as a worksite supervisor and likes to travel doing installation services, guarantee work and inspections in Finland and abroad. He has worked in 11 countries, India being the furthest away. “I have visited many places, where I wouldn’t have gone otherwise”, he says.

Multitalented expert

“I have liked working at Laitex because we have always had work”, Jari says. At Laitex he mainly does mechanical installations but he also does assemblies. He can do almost every job at the workshop. He knows how to service all the equipment. “Back in the day Vilho Raami taught me how to fix the equipment”, he says.

Jari also knows about designing because his dad had a designing office and Jari made technical drawings for him. During Jari’s time off from Laitex, he designed side reinforcements himself and learned to appreciate designers a lot. “I feel bad sometimes when I need to go and complain about something to designers because I know designing is not easy”, Jari explains.

Learning new with juggling

It’s a rocky road for designers to move from school to work life. When they come to work here they get big responsibility and lots of pressure. “They might be scared. At least I would be”, Jari laughs. He thinks that it’s good that we trust youngsters because they learn best from taking responsibility with the help of experienced coworkers. “I’m glad to help. I hope that the designers would ask around more because through conversations our working improves”, he states.

“It’s good to juggle your options”, Jari says. People with different duties pay attention to different things. For example, he has had good conversations with Simo Pöyhiä, Engineering Manager. Jari notices something that Simo doesn’t and otherwise. Jari thinks that it’s great that we have the office next to the hall. If you have something to ask, you can go discuss face to face without waiting for emails. It makes working easier for everyone.

Teach and be taught

Jari teaches the new employees when he has time. Our Quality Engineer Velipekka Leinonen was a turner originally. “Once he came with me on a work trip when I needed a helper. He wanted to try welding and I let him. He liked welding and later became very good at it”, he says. He worked at dockyards and learned how to weld strong structures. Now Velipekka is advising others on welding.

You always learn something new when you are on a work trip. “When Kaukopää factory was in built, Risto from Tampella Power taught me about boiler plants. I have also learned more by myself”, he states. Jari thinks that experience makes a professional and the more years you work the more experienced you become. “People should visit factories more to observe the machines and gadgets to see what others have done. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel – you can learn from others”, he sums.

Previous employees of the month:

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